Happy Holidays to All

I was raised in a household that was interested in learning about people from other countries, including the culture, traditions and beliefs of those people. We weren’t interested in making judgments about what they chose to celebrate or how they chose to do so. It was fun to make a dish from another land, dress up in different attire, or listen to new music while learning about and observing various holidays. Through Girl Scouts, school and at home, I was eager to celebrate people around the world as much as possible, and I guess I took this interest for granted. I now realize how lucky I was to be encouraged to expand my mind and think about others all over the globe, rather than settle for the idea that one culture is the only way, and the only right way. This interest also fosters respect for others and a quest for understanding which I am grateful to be on.

Osmaniye style holidays

Osmaniye style holidays

This year I find myself in a predominantly Muslim country, where December 24th and 25th are working days as usual. There are some festive decorations in the shopping mall, in honor of the coming New Year, but it has been raining now for a week straight, which makes it feel more like fall than winter. The evenings are chilly, but tomorrow temperatures are projected in the sixties. I wish I could send some of this moisture to Oklahoma, where I know it is needed. Although, the blizzard that’s supposed to blow in there just in time to make this year’s Christmas white does sound romantic and exciting.

Our shopping mall, ready for the New Year

Our shopping mall, ready for the New Year

My backyard

My backyard

My neighborhood

My neighborhood

Regardless of the fact that there are very few others around Osmaniye observing the holiday I know best, this year’s holiday season has been filled with merriment. We attended wedding festivities this past weekend, and were embraced by a large Turkish family. It was wonderful getting to spend two days with them, eating and dancing, conversing and laughing. Plus, it was an excuse to dress up, which to me comes with the season.

Family dance party

Family dance party

At the wedding

At the wedding

I found the perfect little Christmas tree—or New Year’s tree, whichever you prefer—at the grocery store just in time to get it decked. Thanks to the Fulbrighter who lived here last year, we also dug up a strand of glittery imitation lights and some jingle bells to adorn the tree. In addition, there was a stocking and a Christmas candle, so we are set. Along with the massive amounts of citrus fruit (33 pounds were brought to us this weekend by Eda’s aunt and uncle) and nuts, two of my most beloved symbols of Christmas, our home is now quite festive.

Our holiday tree

Our holiday tree

One of my favorite activities of the holidays is baking, so after choosing a Pandora Christmas station I fired up our little oven and got to it. Since this is our last week of classes before finals and before the students’ winter break, and because it’s comforting and fun, I decided to whip up chocolate chip cookies for a significant portion of my students, roughly 200 of them. (Recipe note: I have long been a lover of the Neiman Marcus style of adding coffee to my chocolate chip and nut cookies, and in Turkey this works perfectly, since Turkish coffee is already finely ground and just waiting around in excess. And I feel like some of my students get excited when they see such an ingredient listed. They seem to appreciate anything distinctly Turkish.)

holiday baking

holiday baking

My class on Christmas Eve

My class on Christmas Eve

chocolate chp cookies

chocolate chp cookies

Having lived in Germany and spent two Christmases there, missing my German (host) families and friends as well as German Christmas traditions, and generally finding these treats to be spectacular, I couldn’t resist preparing my favorite, Zimtsterne (Cinnamon Stars), even if I did neglect to bring along a star-shaped cookie cutter. This year’s batch will be a modest round cookie, but nonetheless promise the same almond-packed goodness. Discover these simple yet amazing cookies by making your own! Find the recipe here.

holiday baking

holiday baking

Zimtsterne in the works

Zimtsterne in the works

Zimtsterne from 2011, when I had star cookie cutters

Zimtsterne from 2011, when I had star cookie cutters

Eda, Eric and I put together a nice holiday shindig, complete with an expansive dinner (which included leftover çig köfte—raw beef—more on that later), French vin, the baked goods, Turkish coffee and tea, and delightful apricot-preserve-filled donuts sprinkled in powdered sugar. We played Christmas tunes, wore our şalvar pants (as many folks do around these parts; some of you might feel inclined to refer to them as MC Hammer pants…), opened presents and stockings (one of which was one of my personal stockings, but it worked great!), and felt festive. It was quite a success.

Our festive little holiday tree

Our festive little holiday tree

Eric & Eda with their stockings

Eric & Eda with their stockings

Oklahoma tee!

Oklahoma tee!

He is deemed honorary Okie!

He is deemed honorary Okie!

Yep.

Yep. Christmas.

My biggest Christmas gift this year will be getting to spend some time with my dear family, who is patiently awaiting my return to Oklahoma for a visit. I cannot wait. See you so soon, family!

Local walnuts, a present from a student

Local walnuts, a present from a student

Wherever you are in the world, and whichever holiday you choose to celebrate, be it one, none, or many, may it be peaceful, joyous, and delightful—and hopefully accompanied by some scrumptious baked goods.

Happy holidays from Osmaniye!

Happy holidays from Osmaniye!

4 thoughts on “Happy Holidays to All

  1. Merry Christmas! So excited for the zimtsterne! We were travelling all day yesterday to Madison, and had a great Christmas with the Hamels! Our card is in the mail to your parents/you once you arrive in Oklahoma! Love your experiences!

  2. Too late to say Merry Christmas. . . .but i do wish you a very Happy New Year!! Your posts have been a blessing to me. I have enjoyed every one. . . I especially enjoy your thoughts about the culture, the country, the scenery – I just love it all and wish I were young enough to enperience such! I hope you have a safe trip home and a wonderful visit with your family. Blessings upon you. Gerry Hendon, Tulsa

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